Construction Law Blog

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SUBCONTRACTORS ON WASHINGTON PUBLIC PROJECTS CAN NOW GET THEIR RETAINAGE MONEY SOONER

Date: July 20, 2017  /  Author: Brett M. Hill  /  Categories: Out of the Ordinary, Government Contracts, Contracting, Construction News and Notes, Memorable Quotes, Rants and Raves, Recent Legislation, Claims  /  Keywords: SUBCONTRACTORS ON WASHINGTON PUBLIC PROJECTS CAN NOW GET THEIR RETAINAGE MONEY SOONER 1  /  Comments (0)

Subcontractors on public projects in Washington State will no longer be required to wait until final acceptance of the project to get their retainage money. A new statute, which goes into effect on July 23, 2017 and applies only to Washington public projects, will allow subcontractors to get their retainage sooner.

Under prior law, a subcontractor could only get its retainage prior to final acceptance if the general contractor provided a retainage bond to the public owner to secure a release of the general contractor’s retainage and the subcontractor then provided a similar retainage bond to the general contractor in the amount of its own retainage. If the general contractor decided to not provide a retainage bond to the owner, the subcontractor would be forced to wait until final acceptance of the project before it could get paid its retainage.

WSDOT Excludes Non-Minority Women-Owned DBEs from Participation Goals

Date: June 2, 2017  /  Author: Ellie Perka  /  Categories: Recent Legislation, Rants and Raves, Memorable Quotes, Construction News and Notes, Contracting, Construction Bidding, Government Contracts, Out of the Ordinary, MBE/DBE/WBE  /  Keywords: WSDOT Excludes Non-Minority Women-Owned DBEs from Participation Goals 2  /  Comments (0)

A drastic change has been implemented by the Washington State Department of Transportation (“WSDOT”) to the Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (“DBE”) Program in Washington.  Effective June 1, 2017, WSDOT has implemented a “waiver” to exclude women-owned DBEs[i] from qualifying toward Condition of Award (“COA”) Goals on federally-funded projects.  This move is significant.  It will likely result in long-lasting detrimental impacts on the DBE community, women-owned businesses, and the entire construction community in Washington.  The construction industry should be in an uproar over this change.  Instead, it has largely gone unnoticed (likely because its impacts have not yet been felt).  It is a de facto exclusion of women-owned businesses from the DBE program, and the severity of this change cannot be overstated. 

General Construction v. Grant County PUD: Chalkboard Notice is Invalid and Engineer Cannot Waive Notice Requirements

Date: May 30, 2017  /  Author: Brett M. Hill  /  Categories: Change Orders, Claims, Damages, Rants and Raves, Memorable Quotes, Construction News and Notes, Contracting, Notice Issues  /  Keywords: General Construction v. Grant County PUD: Chalkboard Notice is Invalid and Engineer Cannot Waive Notice Requirements 3  /  Comments (0)

 

I previously posted a blog about the General Construction v. Grant County PUD case and the Court of Appeals’ rulings regarding notice and claim procedures.[i]  The General Construction case is also noteworthy for two other issues that were raised in that case.[ii]  The first issue involved whether a contractual written notice requirement is satisfied when the notice is provided on a chalkboard only.  The second noteworthy issue is whether the Public Utility District’s (“PUD”) own in-house engineer could waive the contractual notice and claim procedures in the PUD’s contract.

General Construction v. Grant County PUD: Courts Continue to Struggle with Mike M. Johnson Case

Date: May 24, 2017  /  Author: Brett M. Hill  /  Categories: Notice Issues, Contracting, Construction News and Notes, Memorable Quotes, Rants and Raves, Delay Claims, Claims, Change Orders  /  Keywords: General Construction v. Grant County PUD: Courts Continue to Struggle with Mike M. Johnson Case 4  /  Comments (0)

Another court in Washington was asked to apply the Mike M. Johnson[i] decision to a contractor’s claim for extra work.  This time it was the Division III Court of Appeals in Washington.  The Division III Court of Appeals, which covers all of Eastern Washington, had a hand in the original Mike M. Johnson case.  That court is the intermediary court that ruled in favor of the contractor in Mike M. Johnson.  It held that there were issues of fact as to whether Spokane County, in the Mike M. Johnson case, had actual notice of the changed conditions and, thus, waived the notice and claim procedures that the County was attempting to rely upon.  The Division III Court of Appeals was later overruled by the Washington State Supreme Court, which held as a matter of law that the County of Spokane had not waived the notice and claim procedures.  This time around, the Division III Court of Appeals, for the most part, ruled in favor of the public entity and followed the Mike M. Johnson decision.

Is Reversing an Arbitration Award Going to Become Easier in the Future?[i]

Date: May 10, 2017  /  Author: John P. Ahlers  /  Categories: Claims, Rants and Raves, Construction News and Notes, Contracting, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR)  /  Keywords: Is Reversing an Arbitration Award Going to Become Easier in the Future? 5  /  Comments (0)

Generally, contractors choose arbitration because it is a cost-effective method of dispute resolution, and primarily because an award issued in arbitration is final.  Vacating an arbitration award is only permitted on very narrow grounds.  A party must demonstrate that the award was procured by corruption, fraud, or undue means, or that an arbitrator exceeded his/her power (very high burdens).  Arbitration rules in other states are similar to the Washington statute.  Stated simply, it is very difficult to reverse an arbitration award—or is it?  These two cases do not indicate a trend but do remind us that an arbitrator’s power is limited to that power granted to him/her by contract.

ASBCA Validates New Type of Claim Related to Unfavorable CPARS Review [i]

Date: April 27, 2017  /  Author: John P. Ahlers  /  Categories: Claims, Rants and Raves, Memorable Quotes, Construction News and Notes, Contracting, Government Contracts  /  Comments (0)

For government contractors, an unfavorable performance rating review posted to the Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (“CPARS”) can be extremely costly.  Many of the government-negotiated solicitations include past performance as an important, and sometimes even primary, evaluation factor for contract award.  An unfavorable CPARS review on a past contract can cause the contractor to incur substantial extra costs in addressing the unfavorable review with contracting officers on future solicitations, and, in some instances, the contractor saddled with an unfair or inaccurate CPARS may have to challenge the review and recover some of these costs.

Blog: Congress Strikes a Blow to President Obama’s “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces” Executive Order 13673

Date: March 20, 2017  /  Author: John P. Ahlers  /  Categories: Out of the Ordinary, Government Contracts, Construction Bidding, Contracting, Construction News and Notes, Memorable Quotes, Rants and Raves, Recent Legislation, Employment  /  Keywords: Blog: Congress Strikes a Blow to President Obama’s “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces” Executive Order 13673 6  /  Comments (0)

On October 25, 2016, the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council (FAR Council) and the U.S. Department of Labor implemented former President Obama’s Executive Order 13673: “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces” rules.  The rules became effective on October 25, 2016 and fundamentally altered the way federal contractors and subcontractors will need to handle and resolve employment and labor claims, as well as compliance issues involving their entire workforce.  The final rules can also result in otherwise-capable companies being “blacklisted” and effectively barred from federal contracts and subcontracts based on labor and employment law violations related or unrelated to prior or current federal contract performance.  The centerpiece of the new regulatory scheme was the new disclosure and responsibility requirements.  Contractors and subcontractors needed to disclose all “labor law decisions” that they had during the three years (prior to bid submission) as part of the process of applying for a new federal contract or subcontract.  If a contractor or subcontractor has too many “labor law decisions” to report or the few it has are too severe, pervasive, repeated, or willful in the eyes of the government “experts,” the company could be deemed “non-responsible” and denied a contract.

Be Careful How You Terminate: Terminating for Convenience May Limit Your Future Rights

Date: January 11, 2017  /  Author: Brett M. Hill  /  Categories: Contracting, Construction News and Notes, Memorable Quotes, Rants and Raves, Damages, Construction Defect, Claims  /  Comments (0)

Many construction contracts contain a termination clause that allows a contractor to be terminated either for convenience or for cause.  Termination for convenience and termination for cause clauses have been discussed previously on the blog here, here, and here.  The distinction between a termination for convenience or for cause is an important one.

If a contractor is terminated for convenience, the rights of the party who has terminated the contractor for convenience could be limited in the future.  This is specifically true as to any defects in the terminated contractor’s work that are discovered after the termination for convenience.

Section 8(a) of Small Business Act Favoring Small, Disadvantaged Businesses Upheld Under Equal Protection Clause

Date: December 14, 2016  /  Author: Matt T. Paxton  /  Categories: MBE/DBE/WBE, Out of the Ordinary, Contracting, Construction News and Notes, Memorable Quotes, Rants and Raves  /  Keywords: Disadvantaged Businesses Upheld Under Equal Protection Clause, 7 Section 8(a) of Small Business Act Favoring Small 8  /  Comments (0)

The Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution requires that public bodies and institutions treat similarly-situated individuals in a similar manner.  The government, therefore, cannot apply a law dissimilarly to people who are similarly situated.  For example, in the mid-1970s, the Medical School of the University of California Davis (a public university) reserved 16 of 100 spaces in its class for “disadvantaged” students.[i]  In the seminal case of Regents of Univ. of California v. Bakke, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that racial preference was unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause because an applicant’s race was an explicit factor in determining disadvantage.  In other contexts, however, the U.S. Supreme Court has found that “mere awareness of race in attempting to solve the problems facing [minority groups] does not doom that endeavor at the outset.”[ii]

Courts Take Another Swipe at the Implied Warranty of the Plans and Specifications

Date: December 8, 2016  /  Author: John P. Ahlers  /  Categories: Government Contracts, Contracting, Construction News and Notes, Memorable Quotes, Rants and Raves, Damages, Construction Defect  /  Keywords: Courts Take Another Swipe at the Implied Warranty of the Plans and Specifications 9  /  Comments (0)

Implied warranties are warranties created by law, legislation, or courts.  In the construction industry, one of the most prominent implied warranties is that owners who provide plans and specifications to their contractors impliedly warrant the adequacy of their plans and specifications.[i]  That implied warranty had its beginning in the 1918 US Supreme Court decision of U.S. v. Spearin[ii] and is, therefore, popularly known as the Spearin Doctrine.  Under the Spearin Doctrine, if the contractor completes the work in accordance with the owner’s plans and specifications, but there is a deficiency or failure, the owner, not the contractor, is responsible.  When the owner breaches its implied warranty, in most instances, the contractor is entitled to additional compensation for extra work performed, delays experienced, and other additional expense or loss occasioned by the warranty breach.  A recent case demonstrates that this implied warranty is not “immunity.”  The contractor must still act reasonably and diligently, particularly when the contract provisions so require.